Refugee students cherish US education and freedom

Refugee students cherish US education and freedom

Refugee students arriving from countries around the world still retain their hope in the freedom offered in the United States, despite President Trump’s anti-immigrant sentiments.

Here are some opinions of refugee students in New York City preparing to enter  public schools.

Student from Ivory Coast

“Teachers didn’t teach in my country … I am here to go to school to become a leader in the future. There are more opportunities here … I can be somebody.”

Student from Tibet:

“Tibetan people can’t even learn their own language. We have to learn Chinese. … In the United States, I am free to learn any language.”

Student from Yemen:

“My country is having a lot of disputes that are affecting my education and my life. In the United States, I can finish my education and be the person I think I am.”

Student from the Central African Republic:

“I can’t stay in my country because of the war. I want to have a good education.”

Student from Afghanistan:

“In my country there is war, no security, and no peace. Every week there is a suicide bombing or Taliban attack in the villages and city. There is security, peace, democracy, a great education, and a bright future in the USA.”

Student from Venezuela:

“There is civil war in my country. I want to be in the United States, to have a future and progress as a good person.”

Student from Chad:

“I want to go to school, work, and make money to help my family.”

Author

Karen Collias

My name is Karen Collias and I founded Knowledge Without Borders™ to infuse creativity and innovation into the most salient educational issues affecting contemporary society. I attribute my enthusiasm to cross the borders of traditional knowledge domains to the multi-disciplinary nature of my education and professional experience. The first in my family to go to college, I have a Ph.D. from Columbia University in political science with a specialization in comparative educational systems. My professional experience includes teaching at Princeton University, serving as deputy director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Science Education Center, policy analyst at the U.S. Department of State, and an editor at USA TODAY. Current research interests are first generation college students and innovations in STEM education.

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